News

News

The Douglas County District Court is seeking an attorney to serve as Counsel for Behavioral Health Court

Douglas County District Court is seeking a qualified attorney to serve as counsel for participants in the Behavioral Health Court.  

Requirements are as follows:
(1) the ability to work with participants who are severely and persistently mentally ill; and
(2) available for Court every Thursday from 11:45 am to 2:00 pm.

Compensation is $80 an hour.

Please submit your resume and letter of interest by email to Court Administrator, Linda Koester-Vogelsang by November 1, 2018 at lkv@douglascountyks.com.

Mary Shultz
No DCBA Brown Bag CLE Presentation This Week (October 18)

There will not be a DCBA Brown Bag CLE today. 

The Bar Association is still looking for presenters. If you are interested in presenting a CLE or have any ideas for future CLE presentations, please contact Matt Donnelly at mdonnelly@petefishlaw.com or call 785-843-0450 ext. 2.

Mary Shultz
PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO SUPREME COURT RULES 602-627

The Kansas Supreme Court is considering proposed changes to Supreme Court Rules 602-627 to create a clearer and more comprehensive complaint process for both complainants and judges.  With such extensive revision, a red-line version of the changes is not feasible.  Proposed changes can be viewed on the Kansas Supreme Court website at www.kscourts.org under What's New. 

The Court will accept comment on the proposed changes until 5 p.m. Monday, December 17, 2018.  Comment may be submitted by email to rulenotice@kscourts.org with "Rules 602-627" in the subject line

Mary Shultz
DOUGLAS COUNTY DISTRICT COURT IS SEEKING ATTORNEY TO SERVE AS COUNSEL FOR BEHAVIORAL HEALTH COURT

Douglas County District Court is seeking a qualified attorney to serve as counsel for participants in the Behavioral Health Court.  

Requirements are as follows:
(1) the ability to work with participants who are severely and persistently mentally ill; and
(2) available for Court every Thursday from 11:45 am to 2:00 pm.

Compensation is $80 an hour.

Please submit your resume and letter of interest by email to Court Administrator, Linda Koester-Vogelsang by November 1, 2018 at lkv@douglascountyks.com.

Mary Shultz
New Computers!

We will be replacing 2 of the computers in the Law Library starting on Thursday, 10/11/18. We would appreciate your patience as we make this transition.

Mary Shultz
Juvenile Panel Attorney Wanted

Attorney with experience in juvenile law (child in need of care and juvenile offender) wanted.  Appointed position carries one-sixth of the appointed-counsel CINC juvenile workload in Douglas County District Court representing both children and parents. Required:  Kansas license; GAL training. Monthly payment is $1,925.00. Send resume and letter of application by 5 P.M. Friday, October 5, 2018, to Linda Koester-Vogelsang, Douglas County District Court, 111 E. 11th St., Lawrence, KS 66044. 

Mary Shultz
Supreme Court-appointed committee presents recommendations on municipal court practices

An ad hoc committee appointed by the Kansas Supreme Court a year ago to review bonding practices, fines, and fees of Kansas' municipal courts presented its recommendations at a news conference September 19, 2018. The 18 committee members were appointed by Chief Justice Lawton Nuss in an order signed September 6, 2017. Of the 18 members, 16 are municipal judges, one a city attorney, and one an attorney from the League of Kansas Municipalities. The Supreme Court directed the committee to study current municipal court practices, examine the practices in other courts across the country, and recommend best practices for Kansas municipal courts. The committee's report offered 18 recommendations.

It recommends more lenient bonding schedules for defendants of all income levels. They say bond schedules should not be one size fits all, but reflect individual cases.

The committee says these recommendations have already sparked a statewide conversation.

"Much of this is already being done anyway,” said committee member Rep. Brad Ralph. “Sometimes when we get into day-to-day doing your business you don't very seldom have the chance to step back and consider okay what are we doing. Can we evaluate something? Can we change something? I think that's what this committee is allowing a lot of municipalities to do."

The Office of Judicial Administration and the League of Kansas Municipalities plan to continue examining each of the recommendations and considering next steps. There currently are 394 municipal courts in Kansas, and 234 municipal judges. Some judges serve more than one municipal court. In fiscal year 2017, Kansas municipal courts processed more than 350,000 cases. Fiscal year 2018 data are not yet published.

The state’s city attorneys will review the report at their annual meeting in October.

Mary Shultz
5 Lessons from Archivists at the Smithsonian

Managing Paper Files

Paper files can quickly get out of hand. In a matter of months, your office could be full of overflowing file cabinets and a mess of documents. Where should paper files be stored? If files are used by multiple staff members, you should create a central file solution that's physically accessible to all of the necessary parties. The Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA) website recommends using "out" cards when removing any file from central files to record the name of the file, the date it was removed and the person who removed it. The card should be placed in the space from which the file was removed. This way, files stay organized, no matter who has access to them. The quality and integrity of each step in the records management life cycle is fundamental to success.

Digitization Matters

Today's enterprises are overloaded with information. If separate departments create their own assets, your organization may have fragmented records that are generated with different standards. Furthermore, this process may put your retention periods at risk. This mess might get even worse if your organization has not put a thorough digitization procedure in place.

Transferring or Destroying Records

The SIA facilitate the transfer of permanent records to the archives and temporary records to the records center. Temporary records are held in the records center for a scheduled period of time before they are destroyed. When transferring permanent records to the archives, the museum and other units must follow a series of instructions, including consulting the Smithsonian-wide or appropriate unit-specific records disposition schedule. By establishing an efficient workflow and a clear step-by-step process, enterprise leaders can protect their valuable information.

Establish a Collection Policy

Not every piece of information needs to be preserved forever. The Smithsonian archivists are tasked with the responsibility of creating a collection policy. These policies generally include a limiting factor that identifies the scope of materials that will remain stored and collected.

Within the Institution, there are 11 archives and each one has its own collection policy. Staff members are required to consult with the SIA before they dispose of any records. In an effort to establish a seamless process, the Institution creates schedules that inform staff members how long they need to keep certain types of records, and what to do once those records are no longer needed.

Preserving Electronic Records

In accordance with best practices, the Smithsonian Institution Archives prefers to preserve electronic records in specific formats, such as PDF, TIFF and WARC. Formats should be open, standard, non-proprietary and well-established.

For more information, check out the Smithsonian Institution Archives website.

Mary Shultz